Bill C. Graham

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Another performer named Billy Graham? There goes the neighborhood! That's an incomprehensible comment unless it is explained that this a reference to "There Goes the Neighborhood," a song written by this…
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Another performer named Billy Graham? There goes the neighborhood! That's an incomprehensible comment unless it is explained that this a reference to "There Goes the Neighborhood," a song written by this Billy Graham -- one of many performers with that name -- and recorded by the popular female country-rock singer Shania Twain. A popular studio and session violinist and bassist as well as songwriter, this artist seems to have tried to make use of the credit Bill C. Graham in order to be told apart from the evangelist, the rock promoter, and enough instrumentalists and vocalists to jam a station wagon. The initial ploy has not always been taken to heart by editors, discographers and other individuals in charge of tweaking credits, however.

Graham has considerable options as an instrumentalist and has maneuvered successfully through a variety of different popular trends since he first began recording in the early '70s. He played with country-rock outfits such as Poco and has fiddled through superb records by iconoclastic country performers, among them outlaw country honcho Waylon Jennings, Monkees member Michael Nesmith and songwriting genius Mickey Newbury. His songwriting efforts, frequently accomplished in partnerships, seem to produce material suitable to pop as well as country artists.

Crossover artists such as Glen Campbell and Anne Murray have obviously thus found meat on the plate. Campbell used Graham's "Pave Your Way into Tomorrow" as the introductory route into his variety show on television, the Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour. One of Graham's composition triumvirates is with Carl Jackson and Alan Laney -- "When the Walls Come Tumblin' Down" is one of their numbers, recorded particularly effectively by the bluegrass band Seldom Scene. With Jackson and Buddy Landon, Graham plucked the musical "Desert Flower," a song that has been covered by more than a few country artists.