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Kim Wilde

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1982

Club/Dance

Kim Wilde's second album didn't score any hits on the level of the debut's "Kids in America," although the dramatic "Cambodia" was a sort of cult favorite in some circles. That said, it's a far better album than the patchy debut; the songs are more synth-oriented, at times approaching the dark atmospherics of Japan or Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark. Wilde sings with a clinical detachment here that suits her voice quite well, with an icy edge that's surprisingly appealing.

- Stewart Mason

Glass Ceiling Universe
Glass Ceiling Universe

Apprentice Destroyer

Glass Ceiling Universe

October 23, 2015

Instrumental Rock

Steve Peacock, the audacious San Francisco musician operating under the Apprentice Destroyer moniker, covertly recorded his debut album entirely within the confines of a branch of musical instrument retailer Guitar Center, resulting in a highly creative audio document of a solitary man-machine plotting against humanity in public. The album's ten instrumental compositions range from speedy, guitar-heavy Krautrock (opener "Chrome Temple") to hissy, slightly noisy ambient techno ("Pulse Garden"), utilizing gear from every corner of the store.

- Paul Simpson