DJ Assault

Jefferson Ave.

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When Jefferson Ave. hit the streets in summer 2001, most people knew DJ Assault strictly as a DJ. His Off the Chain for the Y2K album had surprised many in 2000, as did his relentless touring. Anyone who wasn't from Detroit had probably never heard anyone spin records the way Assault does -- not just his frenzied mixing style but also his patented style of super-fast porno bass music. If that's what you're expecting with Jefferson Ave., though, you're in for a surprise. In short, this is a studio album, not a mix album. And it features not so much DJ-oriented tracks as it does listener-oriented songs -- songs with singalong choruses and, more importantly, rapping. Yes, Assault isn't a DJ but rather an MC here. The three songs that were at the beginning of Off the Chain for the Y2K should give you a good idea of what to expect: a fast booty-bass rhythm, a sleazy singalong hook, and just as sleazy rapping during the verses. Sure, it doesn't take long to deduce that Assault is no Rakim, but at least he never claims to be. His rhymes should appeal to the same crowd that finds 2 Live Crew engaging, and his beats should get booties in motion at any club. And beyond that, these songs are undeniably catchy and will have you singing along to the hooks while you shake your ass. Unfortunately, Assault's songs don't hold up so well when they're not within the context of a DJ set. Most will find that within a studio album context, these songs get boring after the first minute and seem relatively lifeless without the kinetic force of a track-a-minute DJ set to drive them. Still, you get the sense that Assault isn't about to give up his DJing profession and is merely taking a vain stab at crossover success here.

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