Original Soundtrack

Black Girl

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AllMusic Review by

Since Black Girl was one of the most obscure blaxploitation movies of the early '70s, it's not surprising that this 1972 album was one of the most obscure blaxploitation soundtracks. Considerable talent was involved in the project, as much of the music was written, produced, and arranged by Ray Shanklin and Ed Bogas, who had produced the music to both Fritz the Cat and Heavy Traffic. As Fantasy Records issued the soundtrack, some considerable vocal and instrumental talent was involved as well, including soul singers Betty Everett and Rodger Collins; Merl Saunders, who does an organ solo on "Chock-Lite Puddin'," which he also co-wrote; and Sonny Stitt, who plays sax on a couple tracks. But as blaxploitation soundtracks go, it's no Superfly. It's just average incidental music in the early-'70s soul-funk style, the most solid song being the Everett-sung and Bogas-penned "Black Girl," which is just OK. Some of the instrumental pieces verge on instrumental gospel, others on easygoing soul-inflected jazz. Collins' "Get Me to the Bridge" revs up the energy a little with a fair upbeat funky soul performance; the more obscure J.J. Malone doesn't do a bad job with the more pensive "No World for Dreamers." Generally the vocal tracks outshine the instrumental selections, but overall this is only likely to appeal strongly to blaxploitation soundtrack collectors, as it's an ordinary LP even within the limits of that genre.

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