Vincent Nap

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b. Vincent Rhone, Trinityville, St. Thomas, Jamaica, West Indies. Rhone nurtured his vocals as a youth singing at the family church in Yallahs, St. Thomas. In the 70s he left Jamaica to join his parents…
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Artist Biography by

b. Vincent Rhone, Trinityville, St. Thomas, Jamaica, West Indies. Rhone nurtured his vocals as a youth singing at the family church in Yallahs, St. Thomas. In the 70s he left Jamaica to join his parents who had relocated to the UK. His love of cricket and the subsequent skills learnt resulted in him being recruited to play professionally for Northamptonshire where he excelled until an injury terminated his career. Undeterred by this setback he returned to his first love and moved to London to pursue a career in music. He joined Grove Music where he worked with artists such as Aswad, Michael Prophet, Yabby You, Wayne Wade, Tommy McCook and King Sounds. His initial involvement was in a supporting role as he undertook duties as a ‘roadie’ and ital cook. In 1998, he formed the All-Welcome Crew, with whom he recorded his debut ‘Honeysuckle Lady’, followed by ‘Need Your Loving’. While the first two releases were moderately successful Nap enjoyed greater fortune with the release of ‘Everyday Everyday’. He also accomplished further kudos with the follow-up, ‘Thanks And Praises’. On the strength of the hits he was commissioned to compose ‘Who Goes There’, that was featured in the soundtrack of Monk Dawson. While building his profile in the reggae chart Nap became involved in stage management and was recruited to administer concerts for artists such as Third World, Jimmy Cliff, Mighty Sparrow and Byron Lee. In 2000, Nap embarked on a hectic touring schedule that included a notable performance in the Homegrown section of the Peace And Love Reggae Festival. He finally released his aptly titled debut, Good Things Come... , through an independent label co-owned by Clifton ‘Bigga’ Morrison. The album featured Nap’s earlier hits alongside, ‘I’m A Musician’, ‘Strugglin’’ and ‘Places’, which clearly demonstrated the singer’s status as one of the UK’s hidden treasures.