Rodeo Boy

Biography by

+ Follow Artist

Members of Rodeo Boy did something a bit unusual for a band that was on a roll and getting a good taste of longed-for success. Instead of doubling their efforts and going after the next brass ring after…
Read Full Biography

Artist Biography by

Members of Rodeo Boy did something a bit unusual for a band that was on a roll and getting a good taste of longed-for success. Instead of doubling their efforts and going after the next brass ring after enjoying the critical praise and airplay they received with the release of the CD How Is It Where You Are?, bandmembers put on the brakes. Not only did they pull back from music, but they also withdrew for a period of about four years. Charles Brookshire, Rodeo Boy's bass player, attributed the musicians' decision to a need to recover from all the hoopla and pull themselves together before going on to work on another album, which they started to do within a couple of years. Once the new album was in the works, the entire process took a total of about 12 months and when the new record was ready, Rodeo Boy had to try to find their fan base again after such a long absence. Thanks to the band's long stretch of silence, many fans thought the group had disbanded. Back on track in 2002 and armed with the hard-won knowledge of how much they can comfortably handle as a band, the musicians of Rodeo Boy put out The Pine and Promise early that year. In addition to playing bass, Brookshire also contributes backing vocals and has a bit of input on the piano, organ, and guitar. The remainder of the lineup consists of lead guitarist Jason Caperton; drummer Jeff Reardon; and his brother, vocalist and guitarist James Reardon. Brookshire is a native of Wilmington, NC, while Caperton grew up in Whiteville, NC. The Reardon brothers traveled frequently with their military family. In 2002, the band was featured on a segment of the television series Dawson's Creek that was filmed in North Carolina, where the band is based. During the early days, the group was a trio that included the Reardon brothers and Brookshire's roommate. When the roommate didn't pan out, Brookshire stepped in to play bass. Regional gigs followed. The proprietor of a few local CD shops approached the band about making a 7" for a new label that he wanted to establish. The project evolved into And the Streets Did Shrink, a full-length release. Not long after, an association with the Godrays developed into a shared 7". Before production began on The Pine and Promise, the trio expanded with the addition of a fourth member, guitarist Caperton.