Milton De Oliveira

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The name of Milton de Oliveira is associated with the creation of immortal classics of the Brazilian song, especially carnival marches. He wrote his first song at 16, "Já Mandei, Meu Bem." In 1934, "És…
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The name of Milton de Oliveira is associated with the creation of immortal classics of the Brazilian song, especially carnival marches.

He wrote his first song at 16, "Já Mandei, Meu Bem." In 1934, "És Louca" (with Djalma Esteves), which was recorded by Jaime Vogeler. With Max Bulhões, he wrote the classic "Não Tenho Lágrimas" and "Sabiá Larangeira" (both in 1937), both recorded by Patrício Teixeira. The former was recorded over 50 times, including renditions by Nat "King" Cole and Xavier Cugat. In 1938, he won the first place of the mayoralty of Rio contest with "Juro," performed by J. B. de Carvalho. He created "Já Mandei Você Embora" with Sílvio Pinto. With Haroldo Lobo, he began a partnership in 1937 that would produce many Carnival hits, like "Porteiro, Suba E Veja!," "Caiu O Pano da Cuíca," "Néris de Tristeza," "Pele Vermelha," "O Bonde do Horário Já Passou" (1940's hit, interpreted by Patrício Teixeira), "Quebrei a Jura," "Miau... Miau...," "Passarinho do Relógio" (hit of the Carnival of 1940 with Araci de Almeida's interpretation), "Miserê," "Passo do Canguru" (1941 hit, interpreted by Araci de Almeida), "A Marcha dos Índios," "A Mulher do Leiteiro" (Araci de Almeida, 1941), "Tem Galinha no Bonde," etc. One of those songs was censored, "Eu Quero É Rosetar," and was recorded in 1947 by Jorge Veiga with great success. In 1945, Linda Batista had a hit with the valse "Baile na Roça," and Jorge Veiga had another in the next year with "Vou Sambar em Madureira." In 1948, he won the second place of the mayoralty contest with "Não Vou Morrer" (with Haroldo Lobo), sung by Jorge Veiga. In 1949, they had another two hits, with "Quem Chorou Fui Eu" (recorded by Jorge Veiga) and "O Passo da Girafa" (sung by Arcai de Almeida). "Pra Seu Governo" was the duo's hit of 1941, achieving the first place of the Carioca Carnival contest in the interpretation of Gilberto Milfont. In 1944, Jorge Veiga had another hit with a duo's composition, this time with the march "A História da Maçã." "A Maria Tá" (recorded by Walter Levita, 1960) and "Índio Quer Apito" (same singer, 1961) were also written with Haroldo Lobo. In 1964, Ari Cordovil had a hit with "Pistoleira," also with Lobo. Many persons claim, though, that he never wrote a verse or a musical note, being acknowledged as partner because he was a hit-maker or caititu, a smart person who knew how to promote the songs on the radio.