Malowe Morris

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The nephew of the 1920s trumpeter Thomas Morris, Marlowe Morris was a fine swing pianist who never rose above the level of a talented journeyman. Early on he played drums, harmonica and ukulele before…
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The nephew of the 1920s trumpeter Thomas Morris, Marlowe Morris was a fine swing pianist who never rose above the level of a talented journeyman. Early on he played drums, harmonica and ukulele before settling on the piano. Marlowe, who was encouraged by Art Tatum, mostly worked as either a solo pianist or a leader of a trio during his main years although there were stints with June Clark from 1935-36, the Spirits of Rhythm in 1939, Coleman Hawkins from 1940-41, Al Sears in 1943 after a brief period in the military, Sid Catlett in 1944, and Eddie South and Tiny Grimes in 1946. Marlowe recorded a fair amount as a sideman in the mid-1940s and appeared in the classic film short Jammin' the Blues with Lester Young and Illinois Jacquet. Around 1946 Marlowe began working for the post office. In the 1950s when he played music it was usually on organ (where he was less distinctive) rather than piano. Marlowe's recording debut was with Lionel Hampton in 1940, but his only album as a leader (completely on organ) was cut for Columbia in 1961-62.