John Aston

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b. 1 July 1942, Oldbury, near Birmingham, Warwickshire, England. Aston gained his first musical inspiration from his parents who both sang old-time music hall hits and popular songs of the day. He obtained…
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b. 1 July 1942, Oldbury, near Birmingham, Warwickshire, England. Aston gained his first musical inspiration from his parents who both sang old-time music hall hits and popular songs of the day. He obtained his first guitar in 1957, at the height of the skiffle craze and subsequently played in a skiffle group, but maintains that, when it was his turn to sing, he always sang a country song. In 1966, primarily because of the greater opportunity to become involved in country music in the area than he found in Birmingham, he relocated to Doncaster, Yorkshire. Aston played with several different groups for experience until March 1971, when he decided to embark on a solo career. He made his first recordings in 1973, ‘The Old Lamplighter’ and the self-penned ‘I Haven’t Changed A Bit’. A television appearance singing the former song attracted attention and led to work around the UK country club circuit. Since then, apart from his albums, he has recorded two EPs, Waylon & Willie (Bird’s Nest 1978) and with Julie Allison Together (Future Earth 1984), and three cassette-only releases Memories (1988), The Old Lamplighter (1989) andEvergreen (1992), and worked on recording sessions with other artists. He has toured the UK with visiting American artists including Red Sovine (1975) and Mac Wiseman (1976). During his long associations with the UK country music scene, he has received many awards, including the Radio & Record Mirror award for Top Solo Performer In Great Britain, which was presented to him by Jim Reeves’ widow, Mary Reeves Davis. One of his best-known songs is the popular ballad ‘Room Of Shadows’, which was written late one night while driving home down the motorway from a show. He has a vast knowledge of songs, even those from music hall days, and in concert, on occasions, he enjoys himself by inviting his audience to try to request a song that he does not know - since his repertoire is in excess of 1, 500 songs and stretches back to the 20s, he is rarely beaten.