Despite his Franco-German-sounding name, Jean-Baptiste Stuck was Austrian-Italian, studied primarily in Italy, and made his fortune composing for the Parisian theater in the 1710s. In his "Confessions," Jean-Jacques Rousseau referred to him as "Batastin," the diminutive of "Baptiste." Stuck was employed by multiple courts within the French nobility, including the court of Philippe II, the Duke of Orleans, who served as Regent in France from 1715. Ultimately, Stuck moved into the service of the Royal Court, though not long after the Regent's death in 1723, he seems to have abandoned composition in favor of working as a virtuoso cello player. Grove's disputes the oft-repeated claim that Stuck was the first to play the cello at the Paris Opéra, around 1730, although it concurs that Stuck's popularity as cellist probably offered an assist ...
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