Jacob Wilhelm Lustig

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A student of Mattheson, Telemann and Kuntzen, Lustig became the church organist at the two Michaelis in Hamburg. He was able to hear a number of prominent organists including J.S. Bach and Lustig was…
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A student of Mattheson, Telemann and Kuntzen, Lustig became the church organist at the two Michaelis in Hamburg. He was able to hear a number of prominent organists including J.S. Bach and Lustig was also a friend of Arp Schnitger the organ builder. In 1728 he acceded to the organist position of St Martin's in Groningen and maintained this position until he died in 1796 at the age of 89. He was quite content in his position. The few compositions by Lustig that are extant demonstrate little originality or import. Unusual harmonic progressions, when they did appear in his music, were forced and clumsy and Lustig's music also illustrates a definitive Italian and German influence in style. Though his compositions were weak his teaching and organ playing were highly regarded. The most important contribution Lustig made to music, historically, were his writings which included translations, of numerous contemporary writings, into Dutch. Although his own conceit and jealousies slant his writings, Lustig provided a great deal of information on the subject of his contemporaries.