Jack Buck

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Jack Buck would have to be a rarity among jazz musicians -- one who always has a buck. The name itself is not so rare, in fact there have been several performers out there with this name, ready to have…
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Jack Buck would have to be a rarity among jazz musicians -- one who always has a buck. The name itself is not so rare, in fact there have been several performers out there with this name, ready to have stupid jokes made about it. The trombonist who was such a big part of the San Francisco Dixieland scene during the '50s should not be confused with the Jack who announced sports events in St. Louis. Coincidentally, both of these men could be seen on local television outlets, a medium for which the name Jack Buck seems to fit like spending money in a billfold. Clancy's Corner was the spot in which to pass the trombonist Buck, a regular San Francisco television series hosted by banjoist and vocalist Clancy Hayes, bandmate of Buck's in Bob Scobey's Frisco Band.

It was in the context of various Scobey outfits that Buck made most of his recordings, more than a dozen sides that also feature players such as thumping pianist Jessy Crump and thrilling clarinetists Bill Napier and Pud Brown. Buck also recorded with New Orleans jazz legends Albert Nicholas and Darnell Howard. While jazz buffs in Iowa will want to claim him as one of their own, Buck's long residency in San Francisco began when he was still a child. His professional associations began with bandleader Ellis Kimball, who took the trombonist on his first road trips. Buck was also part of the Oakland dance band scene during this period.

He first recorded in 1946 on a Pacific release featuring the Frisco Jazz Band, leading directly to the relationship with Scobey. Discographer Tom Lord lists Buck as appearing on more than three dozen recording sessions between that year and 1958. In the early '60s, Scobey relocated to Chicago to start his own nightclub, perhaps too much of an effort considering the fact that he dropped dead a few years later. Buck retired from circulation, his interest in performing jazz seemingly spent.