In Crowd

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The In Crowd was a popular showband in the late 70s led by Phil Callender (lead guitar, vocals, percussion), supported by Errol Walker (b. Earl George Walker, 15 July 1948, Trench Town, Jamaica, West…
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The In Crowd was a popular showband in the late 70s led by Phil Callender (lead guitar, vocals, percussion), supported by Errol Walker (b. Earl George Walker, 15 July 1948, Trench Town, Jamaica, West Indies; lead vocals), Clevie Browne (drums, vocals), Tony Lewis (bass, vocals), Freddie Butler (keyboards) and Wigmore Francis (guitar), with a horn section featuring Egbert Evans (tenor saxophone, alto saxophone, flute) and Barry Bailey (trombone). Browne had performed with his brothers as part of the Browne Bunch in the latter half of the 70s prior to joining the In Crowd. The band initially came to prominence with the chart-topping ‘We Play Reggae’, a laid-back tune that encapsulated the feeling of the summer of 1978. The success of the single prompted eager anticipation for the follow-up. The expectations were fulfilled with the sublime ‘Back A Yard’, which surpassed its predecessor and was regarded as an all-time classic of the genre, with its cheery celebration of Jamaican life. Encouraged by the achievements of the two singles, the band recorded their debut album, His Majesty Is Coming, which mingled various styles in contrast to the melodious single releases. The group performed in their ethereal style covering topics that demanded a heavier sound. ‘Slave Ship’, ‘You Facety Whitey’ and ‘Beg You A Ten Cent’ did not lend themselves to the sugar-coated harmonies of the group. The band enjoyed a further hit with the title-track from their debut and signed to Island Records, who released Man From New Guinea, with less success. The album featured the three earlier single releases alongside six new tracks, notably ‘Marcus Garvey’s Back In Town’ and the prophetic ‘Time Is Running Out’. Despite the short history of the group, they provided reggae lovers with two classic hits, guaranteed to provoke much lighter-waving on the revival circuit. Following the group’s demise, Callender pursued a solo career, notably with the celebratory ‘Island Music’, while Browne went on to become one half of the eminent duo Steely And Clevie.