Harry Graham

b. Jocelyn Henry Clive Graham, 23 December 1874, London, England, d. 30 October 1936, London, England. Educated at Eton College and Sandhurst, Graham joined the Coldstream Guards, becoming aide-de-camp…
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Artist Biography

b. Jocelyn Henry Clive Graham, 23 December 1874, London, England, d. 30 October 1936, London, England. Educated at Eton College and Sandhurst, Graham joined the Coldstream Guards, becoming aide-de-camp to Lord Minto, Governor-General of Canada. Later, Graham was a journalist, writer of comic verse, and librettist and lyricist. His books of verse, some published as by Col. D. Streamer, include Ruthless Rhymes For Heartless Homes (1898), Perverted Proverbs (1903) and Misrepresentative Men (1905). Among many musical works are his English lyrics for The Cinema Star (1914), book by Jack Hulbert, a collaboration with Percy Greenbank on lyrics for Tina (1915), music by Paul Rubens and Haydn Wood, and Sybil (1916), his English version of the original by Max Brody and Franz Martos, as well as the lyrics with Harry B. Smith to music by Victor Jacobi.

A huge success came with The Maid Of The Mountains (1917), book by Frederick Lonsdale, lyrics by Graham, music by Harold Fraser-Simson. In 1920 he collaborated with Adrian Ross on lyrics, and with Dion Clayton Calthrop on the book for A Southern Maid, music by Fraser-Simson. He wrote lyrics for The Lady Of The Rose (1921), music by Jean Gilbert, book adapted by Lonsdale from Rudolph Schanzer and Ernst Welisch’s original. This show was staged in New York as The Lady In Ermine (1922) with variations on book and lyrics by Cyrus Wood. Also in 1921, Graham wrote lyrics and collaborated with Seymour Hicks on the book for A Little Dutch Girl, music by Emmerich Kálmán. Graham and Lonsdale also adapted Schanzer and Welisch’s book for Madam Pompadour (1925), music by Leo Fall and lyrics by Graham. Also in 1925, he wrote lyrics to Fraser-Simson’s music for Betty In Mayfair, by J. Hastings Turner. Another adaptation with Lonsdale was Katja The Dancer (1925) from the original book by Leopold Jacobson and Rudolph Oesterreicher, and for which Graham also wrote the lyrics to Gilbert’s music. The show was staged in New York as Katja (1926).

In the early 30s Graham’s work included Hold My Hand (1931), music by Noel Gay, co-lyricist Norman Blair, and the English book and lyrics for Viktoria And Her Hussar (1931), music by Paula Abraham, which was based upon the work by Alfred Grunwald and Dr. Fritz Löhner (which had in turn been adapted from the Hungarian original of Emmerich Foldes). Graham’s comic verse lives on in the 21st century, much of it appearing on the Internet.