Actor George Hall enjoyed a remarkably long romp in the spotlights in a career that began as the vaudeville era waned. Television buffs from the '90s may have seen him in the Scarlet and Black miniseries or as the doddering Old Indy in a somewhat cheesy prequel to the Indiana Jones saga. Hall was still doing character parts when a stroke caused his death in 2002. He hailed from Toronto, where his vaudeville experience certainly helped with his ascendency on Broadway beginning in the second half of the '40s. His debut was in a show called Call Me Mister, and he eventually appeared in nearly 20 shows. Highlights from his stage activities include Lend an Ear, High Button Shoes, The Boy Friend, and Bent. Television indeed provided an excellent forum for his talents in the '50s and '60s and also represents the main aspect of available ...
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Artist Biography

by Eugene Chadbourne

Actor George Hall enjoyed a remarkably long romp in the spotlights in a career that began as the vaudeville era waned. Television buffs from the '90s may have seen him in the Scarlet and Black miniseries or as the doddering Old Indy in a somewhat cheesy prequel to the Indiana Jones saga. Hall was still doing character parts when a stroke caused his death in 2002. He hailed from Toronto, where his vaudeville experience certainly helped with his ascendency on Broadway beginning in the second half of the '40s. His debut was in a show called Call Me Mister, and he eventually appeared in nearly 20 shows. Highlights from his stage activities include Lend an Ear, High Button Shoes, The Boy Friend, and Bent.

Television indeed provided an excellent forum for his talents in the '50s and '60s and also represents the main aspect of available recorded material featuring Hall. Productions of classic fairytales Cinderella and Aladdin for the boob tube in 1957 and 1958, respectively, are considered classic in themselves and have been reissued by labels such as Sony. Julie Andrews was the star of the glass-slipper saga; Hall performed as the Steward, one of the hard-working roles Walt Disney would replace with an animal in his cartoon version of the tale.

During the '60s, Hall was a regular on two series with enormous audiences, the soap opera Edge of Night and That Was the Week That Was, an often subversive blast of witty satire that for much of the rebel crowd heralded the coming of another weekend. There is somewhat of a lull in his credits in the following decade, but he returned to the Broadway stage for a pair of interesting productions in the late '80s, From the Hip and Johnny Be Good. In 2001 the Radio Spirits label released a CD of Peter Absolute on Erie Canal, a radio production featuring Hall.