General T.K.

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b. Trevor Keith Williams, Manchester, Jamaica, West Indies. Williams began writing lyrics in the parish of Mandeville in his childhood, drawing inspiration from Johnny Ringo. The leading Gemini Hi Power…
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Artist Biography by

b. Trevor Keith Williams, Manchester, Jamaica, West Indies. Williams began writing lyrics in the parish of Mandeville in his childhood, drawing inspiration from Johnny Ringo. The leading Gemini Hi Power DJ encouraged Williams to perform on the sound system s and he embarked on a career adopting the T.K. moniker. His early experience in the dancehall was with the country sound, Wisdom, followed by a spell with Lightning High Power from Spanish Town. His popularity on the sound resulted in his recording debut ‘Nah Money Nah Run’, which was released in 1986 through the production team of Dennis and Junie Star. A number of hits followed with King Jammy and Bobby Digital, purveyors of the prevalent Waterhouse sound. The DJ maintained a high profile in Jamaica, although it was not until 1992 that he gained international acclaim, in spite of two successful Canadian tours. His big break came with Captain Sinbad who released ‘Fanciness’. The tune was a version of the then popular ‘Heart Attack’ rhythm, a reworking of Burning Spear’s ‘He Prayed’. General T.K.’s distinctive gravely delivery, with rough-edged lyrics, is reminiscent of Dirtsman with whom he frequently clashed in the dancehall. The hits continued to flow, notably ‘God Alone’, ‘Main Point’, ‘Poisonous Dettol’ and ‘I Spy’ an answer to Simpleton’s ‘Eye Nah See’. Simpleton’s original version was a barrage of risqué lyricism while Williams’ interpretation has since become a dancehall anthem. By 1993 General T.K. revoiced ‘I Spy’ with debutant producer Adrian Genus. The song again proved a hit and led to his album debut featuring the vitriolic ‘Screwface’, the culturally inclined ‘Preach The Gospel’ and ‘Matie A Mad’ (a tune he had previously voiced with E.J. Robinson). He also recorded with Johnny Osbourne (‘Street Knowledge’, ‘Coke And Crack’, ‘Money Is A Thing’ and ‘Coop A Broke Down’). He continued working with Captain Sinbad being featured on Ragga Clash Volume Two as well as enjoying hits with Henry ‘Junjo’ Lawes, including the hilarious ‘Donkey Meat’, a lewd tune inspired by Major Mackerel.