Eddie Hall

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Bassist Eddie Hall is best remembered by country fans as a member of Timmy Blake & the Rhythm Rebels, a wonderful rockabilly combo that never really got its due thanks to the neurosis of its leader. As…
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Bassist Eddie Hall is best remembered by country fans as a member of Timmy Blake & the Rhythm Rebels, a wonderful rockabilly combo that never really got its due thanks to the neurosis of its leader. As for non-country fans, they have no doubt heard someone named Eddie Hall in some other form of music, but it isn't this guy. Blake formed the group in the early '50s and it also featured lead guitarist Carl Adams, whose innovative and raunchy sound was a trademark of later recordings by Dale Hawkins such as "Suzie Q." Blake tended not to have such good luck with his own recorded efforts. It was hard to establish a trademark or any kind of recognition at all when things kept happening, such as RCA's decision not to release the results of a superb session with additional players such as pianist Floyd Cramer, recorded at the height of the Rhythm Rebels' success.

Hall and partners did manage to snare a regular spot on KTBS radio out of Shreveport, LA. By 1955, the group had also been heard on popular programs such as the Big D Jamboree and the Louisiana Hayride. In 1957, the trio of Hall, Adams, and Blake traveled to Memphis to cut a session for Sun Records, resulting in the classic combination of "Lordy Hoody" and "Flat Foot Sam." The three musicians also wrote songs together, but no amount of creative bonding could sort out Blake's own problems with the performing lifestyle. The bassist also made many uncredited appearances on various Nashville recording sessions from the late '50s and '60s.