Dotti Holmberg

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Dotti Holmberg played an auxiliary role in '60s sunshine pop and, like several people in the circle of cult sunshine pop auteur Curt Boettcher, would attract some notice among collectors more than three…
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Dotti Holmberg played an auxiliary role in '60s sunshine pop and, like several people in the circle of cult sunshine pop auteur Curt Boettcher, would attract some notice among collectors more than three decades later. Holmberg first sang in an act with her sister, Shari Holmberg, in Minnesota's Twin Cities, and hooked up with Boettcher as part of the folk group the Goldebriars in the early '60s. The Goldebriars recorded a pair of twee folk-pop albums for Epic, breaking up on the eve of folk-rock's birth. With her high girlish voice, Holmberg subsequently found work as a backup singer for Tommy Roe, Lee Mallory, Bobby Jameson, and others.

Holmberg also made numerous solo recordings, often of her own compositions, in the late '60s that were never released. Some were produced by Boettcher, others for Bobbie Gentry's company, and others by Holmberg's brother-in-law Keith Olsen (bassist in the Music Machine and later producer for Fleetwood Mac). Many of these, along with some home demos, finally found release in 2002 on Sundazed's Holmberg compilation Sometimes Happy Times. These reveal Holmberg as a pleasant, modestly talented singer/songwriter who was reasonably skilled at incorporating minor modes and moods into a light pop-folk-rock framework. She was also prone to over-romanticism and vocals that sometimes teetered on the helium-high, though the far less ornate home demos kept those qualities in greater check.