Bram Taylor

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b. Bramwell Taylor, 6 August 1951, Leigh, Lancashire, England. Both of Taylor’s parents were musically minded members of the Salvation Army. After initially learning to play cornet and tenor horn, he…
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Artist Biography by

b. Bramwell Taylor, 6 August 1951, Leigh, Lancashire, England. Both of Taylor’s parents were musically minded members of the Salvation Army. After initially learning to play cornet and tenor horn, he moved on to the guitar. Inspired by such artists as Harvey Andrews and Marie Little, he began playing at folk clubs. By 1975, in addition to playing to a wider audience, he was co-presenter/performer for BBC Manchester on the children’s programme Chatterbox. The same year he released his solo debut The Haymakers, more to sound out interest than anything else. Generally traditional in feel, it suffered in terms of production, but provided a good platform for Taylor and his clear vocal style. In 1979, together with Dave Dutton (b. 19 August 1947, Atherton, Lancashire, England; vocals, ukulele, banjo), and multi-instrumentalist Eric White (b. 2 October 1946, Leigh, Lancashire, England), Taylor formed the comedy group, Inclognito. In 1985, White was replaced by Jackie Finney (b. 26 October 1960, Salford, Lancashire, England), but by 1989 Inclognito had been forced to split, owing to Taylor’s solo commitments and Dutton’s acting involvement in the television sitcom Watching.

Taylor had signed as a solo artist to Fellside Records, an independent label run by Paul and Linda Adams, on 1 August 1984. His first release, Bide A While, was well received by the folk music press. Dreams And Songs To Sing (1986) reflected a slight departure in style by the use of more contemporary material, but kept the same formula and the same musicians, including the strong vocal harmonies of Fiona Simpson. The album received the 1987 British Music Retailers award for excellence in the Folk and Country category.

Subsequent albums for Fellside demonstrated Taylor’s ability to take contemporary songs and record them with an underlying traditional feel, thereby pleasing both sides of the folk music ‘divide’. In 1999, Taylor was finally able to give up his day job to concentrate on his performing career. The same year’s Singing! collected material from his first three Fellside albums. He remained with the label into the new millennium, his consistent quality making him Fellside’s longest serving artist.