Arthur Malvin

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Composer Arthur Malvin remains best known for his Emmy-winning contributions to Frank Sinatra's seminal 1968 television showcase A Man and His Music + Ella + Jobim. Born July 7, 1922, in New York City,…
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Composer Arthur Malvin remains best known for his Emmy-winning contributions to Frank Sinatra's seminal 1968 television showcase A Man and His Music + Ella + Jobim. Born July 7, 1922, in New York City, Malvin was the youngest of five children born to Jewish immigrants forced to flee czarist Russia. As a teen he was hired as a singer at the renowned Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, and at 20 was a featured vocalist with the Claude Thornhill Orchestra. While serving in World War II, Malvin assembled the Crew Chiefs, a vocal group that performed with Glenn Miller's Army Air Forces Orchestra. Following Miller's death in an aircraft accident on December 15, 1944, Malvin also toured with his surviving bandmates under the leadership of saxophonist Tex Beneke. After relocating to Hollywood, Malvin became an in-demand session singer on children's records and advertising jingles, his distinctive baritone gracing commercials for everything from Tang fruit drink to Sominex sleeping pills. He also served as a backing vocalist behind Pat Boone, Andy Williams, and the husband-and-wife duo of Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme. With the commercial ascendance of rock & roll, Malvin transitioned from performing into writing and arranging, focusing largely on television. His work with Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, and Antonio Carlos Jobim on A Man and His Music notched his first Emmy Award, with a second coming in 1978 during Malvin's 11-year run with the CBS variety series The Carol Burnett Show. In 1980 he also received a Tony Award nomination for his work on the Broadway smash Sugar Babies. Following a long illness Malvin died at his Century City, CA, home on June 16, 2006; he was 83 years old.