While a pop and Latin vocalist began recording under this name in the mid-90s, an earlier Angelina haunts the record shelves of listeners interested in the overlapping New York jazz, R&B, and early rock recording scenes in the late '50s. In this case, the name Angelina was a pseudonym, most likely plucked out of the air as a kind of shield of obscurity for the real performer behind the microphone, a New York vocalist named Joyce Heath who may have also recorded under the name of Inez Washington, sometimes Inez Lady Washington. The reason for the Angelina dodge may have been protection against the possible legal ramifications of putting out the Confidential album, consisting of older, naughty blues songs such as "Shake Your Can" and "Electrician Blues," with a type of lyric that, while acceptable in the '20s, at least on a legal basis, ...
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Artist Biography

by Eugene Chadbourne

While a pop and Latin vocalist began recording under this name in the mid-90s, an earlier Angelina haunts the record shelves of listeners interested in the overlapping New York jazz, R&B, and early rock recording scenes in the late '50s. In this case, the name Angelina was a pseudonym, most likely plucked out of the air as a kind of shield of obscurity for the real performer behind the microphone, a New York vocalist named Joyce Heath who may have also recorded under the name of Inez Washington, sometimes Inez Lady Washington. The reason for the Angelina dodge may have been protection against the possible legal ramifications of putting out the Confidential album, consisting of older, naughty blues songs such as "Shake Your Can" and "Electrician Blues," with a type of lyric that, while acceptable in the '20s, at least on a legal basis, was beginning to cause some prosecutors' eyebrows to raise in the ultra-wholesome atmosphere of the '50s. It is not really known why Heath, who is credited on the Mastertone session logs with having cut the aforementioned "blue" tracks with accompaniment from pianist Al Williams, later appeared under the name of Washington in settings such as the band of burning Texas tenor man Buddy Tate. Often in these cases the name game is the result of an artist attempting to get around restrictive recording clauses. Speaking of which, the record producer, publisher and songwriter Joe Davis signed Washington -- not Heath, not Angelina -- to a recording contract in 1957, and credited Inez Lady Washington as being the artist behind the Confidential release, despite what the studio may have written down on the original recording logs. One singer, two singer, or three, it really begs the question: does this mean the sexual escapades described in "Electrician Blues" represent a "menage a trois"? At least the listener can take solace in the fact that none of the three are the Joyce Heath that P.T. Barnum took on tour with him, billed as the 160-year old maid of George Washington.