Angel Rosales Alday

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His name sounds like something a mother might tell a bratty child to be when dropping same off chez grandma. Angel Alday would actually seem like something of a saint to those who hold loyalty to musical…
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His name sounds like something a mother might tell a bratty child to be when dropping same off chez grandma. Angel Alday would actually seem like something of a saint to those who hold loyalty to musical tradition above and beyond other creative impulses such as rebellion and deconstruction. By the time Alday was born in the early 20th century, the so-called troubadour movement had been well established in his hometown of Santiago de Cuba for more than half a century. Alday embraced the style as a guitarist and singer and spent his entire career writing and performing songs associated with the genre, touring throughout Central and South America with groups such as Trio Cuba, El Caribe, and El Habana.

An important aspect all of these groups had in common was their trio configuration featuring guitar and voice, in which the focus was on a vivid interpretation of the song at hand. Ignoring or unaware of the adage "two's company, three's a crowd," Cuban troubadours established something of a norm in the trio as the ultimate instrumental combination for delivering a good bolero. Alday's early childhood in Jamaica does not seem to have had a major impact on his musicality, first presented to the public when he began letting loose on troubadour material over Havana's Cadena Roja radio. Alday formed Trio Cuba after spending time in a series of similar ensembles; the group developed into the perfect outlet for his original material, a catalog of songs that includes "No Te Pido Mucho," "Como Tu Nadie," and "Tic Tac," the latter an example of the guaracha style.