In the late '60s, there was an $Andy Brown) playing bass for a group called The Alan Bown Set that was in its death throes. This would be the last line-up of the group, indicating that for Bown things weren't as set as they seemed. Bassist Brown also did some vocalizing, just like another Andy Brown on the British rock scene who recorded with acts such as The Bliss Band, The Eurhythmics and The Hollies. Some listeners have presumed the Brown in the Bown group is the same man as the latter Andy Brown, but it is not. The more famous Brown did not really spring into action until the mid '70s, for one thing. The Brown that played with Bown is also not the Brown that recorded on bass with the Rutles. And none of these people named Andy Brown are the same person as Andy Bown, no relation to Alan Bown. Andy Bown's name often winds up on liner ...
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Artist Biography

by Eugene Chadbourne

In the late '60s, there was an $Andy Brown) playing bass for a group called The Alan Bown Set that was in its death throes. This would be the last line-up of the group, indicating that for Bown things weren't as set as they seemed. Bassist Brown also did some vocalizing, just like another Andy Brown on the British rock scene who recorded with acts such as The Bliss Band, The Eurhythmics and The Hollies. Some listeners have presumed the Brown in the Bown group is the same man as the latter Andy Brown, but it is not. The more famous Brown did not really spring into action until the mid '70s, for one thing.

The Brown that played with Bown is also not the Brown that recorded on bass with the Rutles. And none of these people named Andy Brown are the same person as Andy Bown, no relation to Alan Bown. Andy Bown's name often winds up on liner notes as Andy Brown all the same, the result of a typesetter that just had to do something with the extra "r" that was burning a hole in his fingers. When a session bassist appearance turns up from the early '70s, it is again assumed that it must be the Brown that played bass with Bown--($Alan, not Andy. In the case of the Joyce Everson album entitled Crazy Lady, a bass credit goes to Andy Brown, and a steel guitar credit to Andrew Brown.

Those in the know have suggested this is one the same person, namely the Brown that played with Bown.

Keeping track of all them--or of both Andy Brown and Andrew Brown, if they are actually two different people--may have been what drove lady Everson crazy.