Albert Marre

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b. Albert Moshinski, 20 September 1925, New York City, New York, USA. In the early 50s Marre began directing plays and musical shows on Broadway and although his first efforts, a revival of The Relapse…
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b. Albert Moshinski, 20 September 1925, New York City, New York, USA. In the early 50s Marre began directing plays and musical shows on Broadway and although his first efforts, a revival of The Relapse (1950), The Little Blue Light (1951) and a revival of Misalliance (1953) racked up only some 15 weeks between them, with his next attempt he had a huge success. This was with Robert Wright and George Forrest’s Kismet (1953). The show, which starred Marre’s wife, Joan Diener, and Alfred Drake, was a huge box-office success and this opened the door for Marre. The show ran from 3 December 1953 until 23 April 1955. Unfortunately, Marre was unable to take full advantage of this and the rest of the decade saw a string of short runs and outright flops, including Festival (1955), The Chalk Garden (1955), Shangri-La (1956), Saint Joan (1956), Good As Gold (1957) and Time Remembered (1957). The early 60s were no better with The Rape Of The Belt (1960), The Conquering Hero and Grand Hotel (both 1961), with the latter not even making it into town. The musical Milk And Honey did somewhat better, running from 10 October 1961 to 26 January 1963, but then it was back to more failures: Too Good To Be True, A Rainy Day In Newark (both 1963), Never Live Over A Pretzel Factory, which ran for one week in 1964.

In mid-decade, however, Marre had another smash hit with Man Of La Mancha (1965), in which he again cast Diener, who played Aldonza. The show opened on 22 November 1965 and ran and ran. Shortly before Man From La Mancha, ended Marre staged Cry For Us All (1970), which was another one-week flop. In 1975 he worked on Odyssey, which toured for several months before coming to New York (under the title Home Sweet Homer) where it closed after one performance on 4 January 1976. Marre subsequently tried other projects, such as A Meeting By The River, one performance in 1979, and Chu Chem (1989), but could not recapture the popularity of Man From La Mancha. The show had already had a revival in 1972, and Marre staged other productions in 1977, 1992 and 2002.