Uz Jsme Doma

Unloved World (Nemilovany Svet)

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The differences between Uprostred Slov and Nemilovany Svet, Uz Jsme Doma's first and second albums recorded only months apart, are huge. One must remember the band had been active for five years before it was able to record and release its first LP in 1990. For Uprostred Slov, the Czech avant punk group focused on tight, energy-driven songs. Before the media had a chance to pigeonhole the music, leaders Miroslav Wanek and Jindra Dolansky devised a much more ambitious program that drew ever more from Rock in Opposition and the avant-garde music of the Residents to create a set of pieces that could be described as "symphonic punk" -- the improbable synthesis of prog rock and punk rock. Less immediately likeable than the songs on the first LP, these pieces require a few listens before one can "get into them." Complex, with ever-changing rhythms and styles, they also feature many guest musicians to expand the group's instrumentation. Trumpet, French horn, violin, flute, and keyboards, along with a quartet of singers, all contribute to the beautiful "Vylov Rybníka," and are heard separately on a few other tracks. Each piece is a delight, but the 11-minute "Tangrest" stands out (it's Samla Mammas Manna boarding the punk train). The title track provides a powerful wordless anthem sung with brio by Wanek. Deemed too intellectual and pretentious by some critics, Nemilovany Svet remains Uz Jsme Doma's most impressive album. It was first released in Czechoslovakia by Panton in 1991 and reissued by Indies in 1996. An English version was produced by Memphis and released in the U.S. in 1992 under the title Unloved World (reissued by Skoda in 1997). In 2001, Indies added the English songs as bonus tracks to the original album, making this the "definitive edition."

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