Traindodge

Truth

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AllMusic Review by

The double album is a long and true tradition for some rock bands that rarely results in indifferent responses. The idea of listening to perhaps more than 100 minutes of music at one sitting is a tall order, but only a selected few have managed to pull it off. For the most part, the albums are often convoluted, tedious and an exercise in back-slapping. This is definitely the problem with this collection Traindodge has presented. As the deliberate and slow building "Abandon City!" opens with promise and panache, you get the impression that the group could've made a fine album using the best of both discs. Instead you have too many unfinished and haphazard ideas pieced together. Fragmented between hard rock, power pop, emocore and a new wave synthesized touch, lead singer Jason Smith misses the mark with an insipid "Bent and Broken Down" and a lame, aimless "Watermark" that resembles an early demo session with a fleeting moment of hi-hat goodness. "Streets" is a fine tune that tends to have a Queen sound to it, or a cross of Another One Bites the Dust and Pink Floyd's Animals. "Success Has 1000 Fathers" has emo leanings while veering adventurously into banjo land à la Shrimp Boat. However a horrid error comes during a nearly 11-minute "Failure Is an Orphan" that is generally brutally painful to endure. As for the second disc, it is often more of the same. "Love and Venom" shows hope but it's not enough to last over the length of the song. Instead, you are subjected to self-fulfilling numbers such as "March of the Damned" which is damned from the first note. Only marginally better is a mellow, downtempo "Say Mercy." The great song of disc two is "Bushido" which is focused and delivers the goods. Overall, Traindodge should be admired for such an ambitious project, but this isn't so much a train dodge as a train wreck.

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