Lx Rudis

Crashing the Russian Renaissance

  • AllMusic Rating
    8
  • User Ratings (0)
  • Your Rating

AllMusic Review by

By the turn of the 21st century, free improvisation, even when mixed with pure noise, was a startlingly common phenomenon. Even so, this clever and unusual recording distinguishes itself for its uncommonly distinct sounds. Utilizing only three performers with extraordinary tonal palettes, the 30 mostly short tracks might remind the listener of works by John Zorn or somewhat similar efforts by the group Doctor Nerve, the difference being the focus here on pure noise and the unique instrumentation. Few listeners are likely to be familiar with the darbuka or a Line 6 (green pod), but what is ultimately important is the overall results, which in this case are compelling. Incorporating ambient sounds, computerized static and electronics, as well as unusual tones and even voice, the trio turns their back on convention to revel in the spontaneity of the moment. Many of the tracks are less than a minute in length, and none last as long as six minutes, but the trio digs deeply to unearth some extraordinary moments that disturb, cajole, and unearth new perspectives. To be sure, this recording is radical and often extreme, and is not intended to appeal to a mainstream audience. Those who take the time to discover and appreciate its desserts should not be disappointed, though, as the variety and diversity are nearly overwhelming. If only more musical efforts incorporated the attention to detail and the sense of wonder captured here: a good job all the way around.

Track Listing

Sample Title/Composer Performer Time
1 4:40
2 3:54
3 5:17
4 4:05
5 5:56
6 0:36
7 3:16
8 0:51
9 2:20
10 0:55
11 2:52
12 1:43
13 1:41
14 1:59
15 1:41
16 0:41
17 1:02
18 1:40
19 1:41
20 0:34
21 1:08
22 0:29
23 3:01
24 1:55
25 0:22
26 0:27
27 1:53
28 0:04
29 3:00
30 1:05
blue highlight denotes track pick