Christof Migone

Crackers

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Some readers will recoil only at the idea underpinning Christof Migone's CD Crackers. Through newspaper and radio ads, he recruited people who could make parts of their body crack and pop. He recorded them and created a handful of pieces using only those sounds. So what you hear is a construction (a symphony, if you like) of cracking fingers, jaws, elbows, ankles, backs, etc. This album marks the completion of a project started in 1997. Migone participated in exhibitions and released a few tracks on compilation albums and audio exhibition catalogs, but Crackers represents the complete, definitive work. One must understand the limitations of such a narrow sound palette; the repetitiveness and relative softness of the sounds make for Spartan textures very similar to glitch electronica (paradoxical, isn't it?), especially in the first track. In track five, it seems the artist tried to mimic the crackling sound of a fire. Track six is the most puzzling piece: The pops are lined so closely one to another that they form a delicate drone. Track four presents an excerpt from one of the recording sessions; a "cracker" casually explains to Migone where to put his microphone to best capture his body music -- an example of the composer's deadpan humor. As music, Crackers doesn't cut it: it's limited, linear, eventless, extremely "lower case." On the other hand, as a listening experience and wacky conceptual art idea, it is genuine Migone.

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