Moxo Shriek

Boom, Boom, Boom

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AllMusic Review by

Moxo Shriek was among the one-album wonders of the '90s. A dance-oriented project that was coordinated by saxophonist Tom Borton and drummer/percussionist Bill Moore, Moxo Shriek recorded only one album -- 1993's Boom, Boom, Boom -- and was never heard from after that. This fun, if uneven and inconsistent, effort is best described as early-'90s club music meets Chic, with a touch of jazz. Unlike Chic, however, Moxo Shriek doesn't favor a typical chorus/verse song structure. Boom, Boom, Boom is basically an album of high-tech tracks with scattered samples, sound bites, and female background vocals. Producers Borton and Moore favor a Euro-trashy sort of ambience and a few of the tunes contain French phrases. However, neither Borton nor Moore are from Europe -- both are American musicians -- and coming from Americans, the Euro-trashy ambience seems campy and very ironic. But then, camp and irony are probably what Borton and Moore wanted when they produced sleek numbers like "Paris After Dark," "The Sounds of Love," and the sexy (or pseudo-sexy) "Scent of a Woman." And that's what makes Boom, Boom, Boom as fun and entertaining as it is -- when Americans try to be Euro-trashy, they usually can't do it as convincingly as people from England, France, or Germany, but are likely to have fun trying. Whether or not Borton and Moore meant to be silly is beside the point; ultimately, they do come across as silly, and that isn't a bad thing because there is certainly room for campy escapism and comic relief in this world. This CD was recorded in Los Angeles -- not Paris, London, Milan, or Munich -- and it shows. But again, Boom, Boom, Boom's pseudo-European leanings are a plus for those who like their dance music on the campy side.

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