Zulema was a pioneer of sorts in that she was a '70s Black R&B singer who wrote much of her own material, and took on some of her own production. The records themselves were average forerunners of urban contemporary music, occasionally reaching the lower parts of the R&B charts, with Zulema's vocals betraying a strong Aretha Franklin influence. Born Zulema Cusseaux in Tampa, Florida, she was a member of the Lovelles in the late '60s and early '70s. A Van McCoy-produced Lovelles single ("So Much Love") became a Top 20 R&B hit in 1971, but Zulema went solo shortly afterwards, recording a couple of albums for Sussex. She saw her biggest hits with a series of LPs for RCA in the mid-'70s, and reached the middle of the R&B charts in 1975 with "Wanna Be Where You Are." Her recording career ended after an album for Le Joint in the late '70s.
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Artist Biography

by Richie Unterberger

Zulema was a pioneer of sorts in that she was a '70s Black R&B singer who wrote much of her own material, and took on some of her own production. The records themselves were average forerunners of urban contemporary music, occasionally reaching the lower parts of the R&B charts, with Zulema's vocals betraying a strong Aretha Franklin influence.

Born Zulema Cusseaux in Tampa, Florida, she was a member of the Lovelles in the late '60s and early '70s. A Van McCoy-produced Lovelles single ("So Much Love") became a Top 20 R&B hit in 1971, but Zulema went solo shortly afterwards, recording a couple of albums for Sussex. She saw her biggest hits with a series of LPs for RCA in the mid-'70s, and reached the middle of the R&B charts in 1975 with "Wanna Be Where You Are." Her recording career ended after an album for Le Joint in the late '70s.