Wayne Kelly

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Career title specialists were standing by in reference to this artist in order to discuss the perimeters of his responsibilities as a project or production coordinator on a series of easy listening releases…
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Career title specialists were standing by in reference to this artist in order to discuss the perimeters of his responsibilities as a project or production coordinator on a series of easy listening releases during the '90s, how for example these job titles differ from that of simply a producer or whether a production or project consultant is necessary to actually determine the differences, if there are any. Agreement was easily reached to abandon said discussion once it was realized that this is most likely the same Wayne Kelly whose earlier activities resulted in a censored record entitled "Don't Fuck Around with Love," or "Don't ?(!)?(!) Around with Love" as indicated nervously on the original label. Assuming Kelly is a nice Irish Catholic lad, his confessor should be ready to double the tally of prayers necessary for absolution, since Kelly not only condoned nasty language on the record but violated another of the Ten Commandments -- "Thou Shalt Not Steal" -- by putting it out.

The 1971 single under discussion was an out-and-out bootleg of material by two vocal groups already under contract to producer and A&R man Joe Davis, the Sparrows and the Blenders. The latter group's "Don't Play Around with Love" provided the blueprint for the "dirty" version. Instead of trying to quash the release when he found out about it, Davis simply tracked down Kelly and signed him to a contract. In 1973 Davis put out his own pressing of the lewd version, complete with a sticker in which the once and sometimes still censored word is printed in letters at least two inches in height. Kelly's Kelway catalog also includes what seems to be the man's main residue as a performer in his own right. Leading combos known as both Wayne Kelly & the Delusions and Wayne Kelly & His Delusions, or perhaps just thinking that he did, the Kelway honcho turned out a 45 whose A and B sides are of equal interest to students of individual responsibility, "Do What You Did" and "I Do."