Sydney Rogers

b. 1948, Antigua, West Indies. Rogers’ vocal skills were gleaned from singing in his local church choir before relocating to the UK in 1964. On his arrival in London the singer embarked on an engineering…
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Artist Biography

b. 1948, Antigua, West Indies. Rogers’ vocal skills were gleaned from singing in his local church choir before relocating to the UK in 1964. On his arrival in London the singer embarked on an engineering apprenticeship, although he harboured aspirations towards a career in music. While he pursued his apprenticeship Rogers practised singing along with his guitar and eventually joined a local band called the Wranglers. They spent the late 60s and early 70s touring the Middle East and American army bases in Germany. In 1971, they released ‘Let It Be’, with Rogers’ composition, ‘Looking Back’, relegated to the b-side. The purely commercial decision irritated the singer and he left the group. The Wranglers subsequently performed as the Mohawks and are best remembered for the organ-led instrumental, ‘The Champ’, that crossed over into the UK pop chart in 1987. After leaving the Wranglers, Rogers appeared to abandon his musical career and he returned to engineering and a married life. In 1973, a mutual friend introduced him to the UK-based producer Larry Lawrence, that resulted in a return to the music industry. Rogers recorded ‘Don’t Throw Stones’, that proved a sizeable hit within the West Indian community. This success resulted in Lawrence enlisting the Jamaican All Stars, that included musicians such as Hux Brown, Jackie Jackson, Winston Wright, Gladstone Anderson and Mikey Chung, to play on sessions for Miracle Worker. The singer’s parlance, combined with authentic Jamaican rhythms, resulted in the album being considered by critics and fans alike to have been recorded ‘back a yard’. While Rogers enjoyed success with the album and the release of the title track as a single, his follow-ups ‘Another Lonely Night’ and ‘Once Upon A Time’ were unable to emulate the feat. The singer has since maintained a low profile, although in 2001 the demand for re-issues resulted in the release of Miracle Worker on Lawrence’s newly formed Larry’s label.