Siloah

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Siloah were an obscure underground Krautrock group from Munich with connections with the better-known Amon Duul. Like the original Amon Duul, Siloah arose out of the commune culture of the 1960s to craft…
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Siloah were an obscure underground Krautrock group from Munich with connections with the better-known Amon Duul. Like the original Amon Duul, Siloah arose out of the commune culture of the 1960s to craft psychedelic rock that was seriously acid-damaged and freaked out and far more creative than the clich├ęs of the typical rock from the hippy era. Thom Argauer played in a Dixieland band with Chris Karrer in the late 1960s before Karrer went on to become one of the founders of Amon Duul II, while Argauer moved to Munich and started a new group with Manuela von Perfall, Heinrich ?Tiny? Stricker, and Wolfgang Gorner. By 1970 they chose the name Siloah, because they liked the sound of it, not realizing that it was a biblical term, as they were way too cool to have anything to do with Christianity. With the core group, Siloah was open to anyone else who wanted to play, mostly others hanging out at the Baumstassen commune where many of the group lived for a while before they eventually moved to an abandoned farmhouse on the outskirts of the city. Their sound was mostly acoustical rock, inspired by the West Coast psychedelic scene, though more improvised and slightly amateurish with the inclusion of the many untrained musicians. That same year in a small Bavarian town in the Allgauer Alps, they recorded an LP with guest musicians ?Buddy? Bernd Beier, Klaus Bartl, Ali Schollenbruch, and a flautist named Mao. The sessions had a very loose and improvised atmosphere, and the untitled record was self-released, with about 600 copies pressed. The album was re-issued in small numbers under the title Saureadler the next year by the small German blues & Underground label. The group also traveled around to various festivals and other gigs, usually all crowded together in a rickety VW van. By mid-1971 many of the group moved away from the farmhouse and Argauer, who had now switched from acoustic guitar to organ, wanted to start another band. He recruited new members Markus Krug and Florian Laber and the trio retained the name Siloah. In the spring of 1972 they recorded a second album with Swiss percussionist Blacky Zumstein. The record?s title, Sukram Gurk, was chosen because Krug?s name looked the best spelled backwards, and later that year this record was also released by the German Blues & Underground label. Though driven by organ and electric guitar rather than acoustic guitars, the album has the same loose improvised feel and unprofessional charm as the first record. Siloah lasted for another year before breaking up in the second half of 1973 as the musicians went on to other projects.