Moon's Train

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Most known as one of several acts that Rolling Stones bassist Bill Wyman produced and wrote songs for in the 1960s, Moon's Train issued just one single while active, the 1967 release "Deed I Do"/"It's…
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Most known as one of several acts that Rolling Stones bassist Bill Wyman produced and wrote songs for in the 1960s, Moon's Train issued just one single while active, the 1967 release "Deed I Do"/"It's in My Mind." The group did, however, record quite a bit of material in 1965-1967, enough to fill up an entire 21-song CD in 2005. The band is also noted for including a teenage Peter Frampton in their ranks at one point, though he was only in the lineup briefly, and did not play on many of their recordings. Contrary to what fans of the Rolling Stones and Frampton's later groups (and solo material) might expect, however, most of Moon's Train's tracks are rather pedestrian, jazzy blue-eyed soul with a hint of ska, somewhat in the mold of a few similar British acts of the era such as Georgie Fame and Simon Dupree & the Big Sound.

For a group that released just one single, Moon's Train had a pretty complicated history. Some of their roots were in the Beckenham band the Preachers, who included keyboardist, singer, and songwriter Peter Gosling, as well as the young Frampton and drummer Tony Chapman. The Bill Wyman connection came about as Chapman had played in Wyman's pre-Rolling Stones group the Cliftons, and had very briefly played alongside Wyman at a few early Rolling Stones gigs before being edged out by Charlie Watts. While they were still called the Preachers, the group -- now managed and produced by Wyman -- put out a 1965 single. Soon after its release, they changed their name to the Train, and around early 1966, they changed their name again to Moon's Train, sparked by the nickname of Peter "Moon" Gosling. Though it's believed that Frampton was still in the band when their single was recorded in April 1966 (though it wouldn't come out for almost a year), he left shortly afterward to join the Herd.

Moon's Train continued to record in hopes of getting an album together, most of the material being co-written by Gosling and Wyman. However, none of the material they cut subsequent to the single was released, although a couple Gosling-Wyman songs that indicated a move toward a more psychedelic direction, "Loving, Sacred Loving" and "Shades of Orange," were recorded by another group Wyman produced, the End. Moon's Train drifted apart by the end of the 1960s, however, and while Gosling has recalled being approached by Mick Fleetwood to join Fleetwood Mac when that band was being formed in 1967, he didn't do so. The full Moon's Train story is told in the liner notes to the 21-track 2005 CD The Life I Lead, which includes their sole single and 19 tracks that were recorded while the group was together, but not released in the 1960s.