Mack David

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Although overshadowed by his brother Hal David, he was a popular songwriter, often for films and television.
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Tin Pan Alley lyricist Mack David is best-known for his television and movie themes and scores, with his most important work spanning the early '30s through the 1960s. Born in 1912 in N.Y.C., the older brother of lyricist Hal David attended Cornell University and St. John's Law School. Some of David's best-known songs include "Rain, Rain, Go Away" (1932), "Moon Love" (1939), "What Do You Know About Love?" (1939), "A Sinner Kissed an Angel" (1941), "I'm Just a Lucky So-and-So" (co-written with Duke Ellington in 1945), "Candy," "Chi-Baba, Chi-Baba" (1947), "I Don't Care if the Sun Don't Shine" (1949), and "La Vie en Rose" (1950). He also wrote the familiar themes for many TV shows, including Casper the Friendly Ghost, 77 Sunset Strip, Hawaiian Eye, and Bourbon Street Beat, and title songs for such films as It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World" (1963) and The Dirty Dozen (1967). Mack David collaborated with many composers over the years, such as Jerry Livingston, Al Hoffman, Alex Kramer, Count Basie, Burt Bacharach, Henry Mancini, and many more.