Julie Coryell

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Author, singer, and muse Julie Coryell remains best remembered for her seminal 1978 book Jazz-Rock Fusion: The People, the Music, written during her marriage to one of the fusion genre's true innovators,…
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Author, singer, and muse Julie Coryell remains best remembered for her seminal 1978 book Jazz-Rock Fusion: The People, the Music, written during her marriage to one of the fusion genre's true innovators, guitarist Larry Coryell. Born Julie Nathanson in Manhattan, she was the daughter of singer and stage actress Carol Bruce and married Coryell in 1968, around the time the guitarist emerged as a talent to watch via his contributions to sessions headlined by Gary Burton, Herbie Mann, and Steve Marcus. His 1969 Vanguard label debut, Lady Coryell, was dedicated to Julie, and her portrait was featured prominently on its cover -- the couple also adorned the cover of the follow-up, Coryell, for which she additionally penned the liner notes. Julie made her recorded debut by contributing vocals to Larry's 1971 album Live at the Village Gate. In addition to repeat performances on LPs including The Real Great Escape and Comin' Home, Julie managed Larry's career for over a decade and also helped him compose a number of songs, including two on his fusion classic Spaces. She teamed with photographer Laura Friedman for Jazz-Rock Fusion: The People, the Music, which contained interviews with 58 musicians including Jaco Pastorius, Randy Brecker, and John Abercrombie -- most notably, Coryell sat down with Miles Davis for what proved to be the sole interview conducted during his retirement in the late '70s. The Coryells divorced in 1985, and a year later Julie relocated to Woodstock, NY, where she helped found the Woodstock Experimental Writers Theater. Coryell died unexpectedly on May 10, 2009 -- she was 61.