John "Duff" Lowe

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John "Duff" Lowe played piano with the Quarry Men for a while in the late 1950s, probably around late 1957 and 1958. He wasn't in the band long and he wasn't an important member, but he was present when…
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John "Duff" Lowe played piano with the Quarry Men for a while in the late 1950s, probably around late 1957 and 1958. He wasn't in the band long and he wasn't an important member, but he was present when the Quarry Men -- also including John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and drummer Colin Hanton -- went into a studio in Liverpool to record a couple of songs for a vanity disc. Only one copy of the disc containing the songs, "That'll Be the Day"/"In Spite of All the Danger," was made, as a shellac demo. These songs appear on the Beatles' Anthology 1 collection. To Lowe's good fortune, he ended up with the copy, and in 1981, he sold it to Paul McCartney for a good sum of money. The December 1998 issue of Record Collector, in fact, rated it the rarest and most valuable British record, estimating its value to be at least twelve thousand pounds. In 1994, he played on the Quarry Men reunion album Open for Engagements (which featured only one other musician that had played in the Quarry Men in the 1950s, Rod Davis).