Jerry Murray

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"Papa Chew Do the Boo-Ga-Loo" was the howling and knowing signature to a serious soul groove from Jerry "Jerry-O" Murray. A Jerry-O 45 almost always involved Murray's slick slang hanging all…
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"Papa Chew Do the Boo-Ga-Loo" was the howling and knowing signature to a serious soul groove from Jerry "Jerry-O" Murray. A Jerry-O 45 almost always involved Murray's slick slang hanging all over an upbeat backing track designed to capitalize on th latest dance craze. Born October 1939 in St. Louis, MO, Murray was a disc jockey and promoter in Chicago through the late 1950s before moving to Detroit-town -- where everybody gets down -- in the early '60s. As part of Tom & Jerry-O, Murray first had rhythm & blues chart success with "Boo-Ga-Loo," a record based on a new step at the time, released in 1965 on ABC/Paramount. Tom was Robert "Tommy Dark" Tharp, a former member of Chicago's the Ideals. Berry Gordy successfully sued for copyright infringement, meaning the duo saw little of the money the record generated. Tom & Jerry-O recorded two follow-up singles, both of which failed to generate much interest. Murray then hooked up with Detroit "impresario" Sammy Kaplan to start Boo-Ga-Loo records in 1966. There he recorded his best work -- free-flowing, bass-heavy soul workouts punctuated with frantic horn bursts. He reached the Billboard charts again with "Karate Boo-Ga-Loo" in 1967, peaking at number 16 R&B and number 51 on the pop charts. Despite fine releases like "Soul Sister" and a wicked take on James Brown's "There Was a Time," Murray never had any significant chart action. He served as producer for Volt Records on two fine 1970 singles for St. Louis disc jockey Bernie Hayes, both of which sound very similar to Murray's own work. Fading away like a dance craze, little was heard from Murray before he died in the late '70s.