Harry Link

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Composer Harry Link is best-known for co-writing the standards "These Foolish Things" and "I've Got a Feeling I'm Falling." Born Harry Linkey in Philadelphia on January 25, 1896, he attended the University…
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Composer Harry Link is best-known for co-writing the standards "These Foolish Things" and "I've Got a Feeling I'm Falling." Born Harry Linkey in Philadelphia on January 25, 1896, he attended the University of Pennsylvania and studied business in its Wharton School. One of his earliest professional songs was co-written with Irving Berlin -- 1914's "Along Came Ruth." In 1916, he acted in the film The Masked Rider, but didn't make it a full-time career; instead, he worked on his songwriting while managing the business end of several different music publishing companies over the years. His first big-time success came with 1929's "I've Got a Feeling I'm Falling," which he co-wrote with Billy Rose and the legendary pianist Fats Waller; the song was a hit for Waller and was later recorded by Louis Armstrong, among many others. Link wrote several other songs with Waller, among them "Gone" (with Andy Razaf) and "I Hate to Leave You Now" (with Link's eventual wife, Dorothy Dick; this tune was also recorded by Armstrong).

Link and Dick also collaborated frequently, often with outside writers, which produced songs like "By My Side" (1931), "Until We Meet Again Sweetheart," and "Peelin' the Peach" (which was recorded by Paul Whiteman). In 1932, Link contributed material to the film Blondie of the Follies, and four years later he landed the biggest hit of his career with "These Foolish Things (Remind Me of You)," which was co-written by Jack Strachey and Eric Maschwitz. That year alone brought five Top Ten versions of the song, including renditions by Benny Goodman and Teddy Wilson & Billie Holiday; it was recorded by countless others, and was even a hit in France for Jean Sablon (under the title "Ces Petites Choses"). After 1937, Link spent much of the remainder of his career working in a business, rather than creative, capacity. He died in New York City on July 5, 1956.