Hamid Drake

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Brilliant and versatile avant-garde jazz drummer, who comfortably adapts to African, Indian, and Latin styles.
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Emancipation Proclamation: A Real Statement of Freedom
A highly regarded percussionist known for his extensive work in avant-garde jazz and improvised music, Chicago's Hamid Drake has an expansive style that incorporates Afro-Cuban, Indian, and African percussion elements. Initially emerging in saxophonist Fred Anderson's group in the 1970s, Drake has collaborated extensively with top free jazz improvisers like Peter Brötzmann, Ken Vandermark, and William Parker, among others. He has also drawn praise for his eclectic albums, including 1992's Hyperion, 2000's Emancipation Proclamation: A Real Statement of Freedom, and 2007's From the River to the Ocean with Anderson.

Dark Day + Live in Verona 1979
Born in Monroe, Louisiana in 1955, Drake later moved with his family to Evanston, Illinois just north of Chicago. There, he started out playing drums in rock and R&B bands before meeting noted saxophonist Fred Anderson. It was during this period that he made his recorded debut with Anderson, appearing on albums like 1978's Another Place and 1979's Dark Day. It was also via his connection to Anderson and participation in the saxophonist's workshops that he met George Lewis and other members of the influential AACM. He began branching out, and by the late '70s, he was also a member of Foday Muso Suso's Mandingo Griot Society, and he'd toured Europe with trumpeter Don Cherry and fellow percussionist Adam Rudolph.

Die Like a Dog: Fragments of Music, Life & Death of Albert Ayler
Over the next decade, Drake began branching out, working with Herbie Hancock, Jim Pepper, Pierre Dørge, and others. He also played with the Latin jazz band Night on Earth, the Georg Graewe Quartet, the DKV Trio, and Liof Munimula, the latter of which is one of the oldest free improvising ensemble in Chicago. He also formed a lasting relationship with saxophonist Peter Brötzmann, appearing on albums like 1992's Hyperion, 1993's Die Like a Dog: Fragments of Music, Life & Death of Albert Ayler, and 1998's Dried Rat Dog. Along with continued work with Anderson, there were also sessions with percussionist Michael Zerang (with whom he has performed a solstice celebration semi-annually since 1991), Bill Laswell, Mats Gustafsson, Marilyn Crispell, Pharoah Sanders, and more.

Never Too Late But Always Too Early
Drake continued to appear on numerous albums throughout the 2000s, appearing as a leader or a co-leader for a number of labels including Chicago's Okka Disc and Thrill Jockey, France's Rogue Art, Eremite, Nero's Neptune, and ESP-Disk. In 2000, he collaborated with saxophonist Joe McPhee on Emancipation Proclamation: A Real Statement of Freedom, and then rejoined Brotzmann and Parker for 2003's Never Too Late But Always Too Early. A year later, he issued Back Together Again with Anderson, and then joined David Murray for he saxophonist's 2004 Gwotet album. He also recorded several live trio dates with Parker and saxophonist Albert Berger, released in 2006 as Evolving Silence, Vol. 1 and Vol. 2. There were also notable sessions with Hugh Ragin, Kidd Jordan, and Archie Shepp, among others.

Jungle: Live at Okuden
The 2016 release Live at Okuden: Jungle (recorded in 2012) was the final recording curated by ESP-Disk's founder Bernard Stollman. Drake also appeared in a trio setting led by saxophonist/clarinetist and flutist Mat Walerian, along with pianist Matthew Shipp. In July 2016, Otoroku issued Song Sentimentale by the trio of Peter Brötzmann, William Parker and Drake -- their first recording together since 2003's Never Too Late But Always Too Early. The album, compiled from three nights of concerts at Cafe Oto, was issued in two volumes in different formats, each entertaining a unique track listing. He then paired with clarinetist and saxophonist Sylvain Kassap for 2017's Heads or Tails, followed a year later by a trio effort, Karuna, with saxophonist Ralph Jones and percussionist Adam Rudolph.