Ginny Gibson

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Penny-pinchers might be the only ones who snap to attention when the name Ginny Gibson comes up -- that is, if they have carefully studied the history of their thrifty obsession with regard to the recording…
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Penny-pinchers might be the only ones who snap to attention when the name Ginny Gibson comes up -- that is, if they have carefully studied the history of their thrifty obsession with regard to the recording industry. Singer Gibson, whose backup band was sometimes called the Song Spinners, was one of the first performers to be available on a so-called "budget-line" album. The year was 1962, it was a compilation entitled Family Album, and the price was one buck. Having hinted strongly that this is a recording artist who has not experienced enduring celebrity, it is now time to ward off the presumption that Ginny Gibson, from the sound of her name, has something to do with country & western. She was actually a pop vocalist who paid her dues singing with big bands. Her stage name was the type of gimmick associated with this genre; in one such combo she took over from Kitty Kallen and was replaced by Jay Johnson.

Gibson had a steady string of record releases in the '50s and early '60s, mostly in the form of 45 singles. Her repertoire reveals an interest in bizarre novelty songs, displayed on both vinyl product and set list features with her various employers. With the Eddie Sanfranski Orchestra, she was brought forth to hatch both "Doodle Bug" and "Scutter-Botch," evidence of which is found on airchecks from this band. "The Chihuahua Choo Choo" was the subject of an MGM single; this time, Joe Lipman conducted the orchestra. Promotional fiend Joe Davis made use of her MGM contract when he was hired by the label to produce and do A&R, escorting Gibson into the studio to chant a version of "Mommie's Little Angel," a song with an advertising campaign that makes telemarketers seem subtle. The Gibson discography also includes Dixieland, plenty of romance ("Dreaming by the Fire," "I Wonder Why," "That's How Love Comes"), and even a stab at country & western.