Father Abraham And The Smurfs

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If ever popular music veers too close to being a serious topic of academic cultural discussion, one only has to remember episodes like those of the Smurfs in the late 70s. While the punk wars raged around…
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If ever popular music veers too close to being a serious topic of academic cultural discussion, one only has to remember episodes like those of the Smurfs in the late 70s. While the punk wars raged around them, Father Abraham And The Smurfs mounted their chart bid with "The Smurf Song", released on Decca Records in May 1978. Conducted in a semi-duet fashion, with Father Abraham leading the assembled midget characters in call-response chants, delivered in their eminently silly, high-pitched voices, it served to introduce the concept of Smurf culture to the nation. The Smurfs, also depicted in a cartoon series, lived in forests and promoted pre-environmental awareness good while hiding from human beings. Similar to the Wombles concept of a few years earlier, Father Abraham And The Smurfs enjoyed two further UK charts hits, "Dippety Day" (number 13) and "Christmas In Smurfland" (number 19). This prompted music business maverick Jonathan King to release his own cash-in novelty record, "Lick A Smurp For Christmas (All Fall Down)", credited to Father Abraphart And The Smurfs. There were also a number of albums for the more masochistic fans to buy.