Eric Eisner

Biography by

Eric Eisner is known to the world at large mostly as a music and movie business mogul, eventually becoming president of The David Geffen Company and working in film and stage production. To the music…
Read Full Biography

Artist Biography by

Eric Eisner is known to the world at large mostly as a music and movie business mogul, eventually becoming president of The David Geffen Company and working in film and stage production. To the music fan, however, his fame rests primarily on a song that wasn't released until more than 30 years after it was recorded. In the mid-'60s, Eisner was on the edges of the folk-rock scene, becoming friendly with stars and future stars, including Stephen Stills. Stills' group Buffalo Springfield recorded one of Eisner's songs, "No Sun Today," in March 1967. This is one of the Springfield's most atypical recordings, with a light, breezy feel that brings their folk-rock close to the California harmony sunshine pop of more lightweight groups like the Association. The earthier chorus, though, was more in line with the kinds of things that Stills liked to sing with the band. It was not released, though, until 2001, when it appeared on Buffalo Springfield's Box Set career retrospective.

As a teenager in the mid-'60s, Eisner was drummer with the Strangers, a New York rock band that shared management with the Lovin' Spoonful. While doing the Greenwich Village circuit, they would often open for the Spoonful at the Night Owl, but broke up in the fall of 1965 when Eisner and bassist Larry Hendel decided to finish high school rather than tour with the band. (They later re-formed without Eisner and did a single, subsequently evolving into the Fifth Avenue Band.) Eisner wrote both sides of, and plays guitar on, the obscure 1968 single by Nora Guthrie, "Emily's Illness"/"Home Before Dark." Guthrie, the daughter of Woody Guthrie (and brother of Arlo Guthrie), was Eisner's girlfriend at the time, and only 17 when the single was recorded.

Eisner subsequently got a law degree from Columbia University, though he did get some more of his songs into the repertoire of other artists, including Kenny Rankin, the Turtles, Deniece Williams, and Howdy Moon. Eisner became an entertainment attorney in Los Angeles, working as president of The David Geffen Company in the '80s, and overseeing the production of the films Risky Business, After Hours, Beetlejuice, and The Last Boy Scout, as well as the stage productions Cats and M. Butterfly. He also became CEO of Island World Inc., which produces feature films and television projects.