Doc Hopkins

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b. 26 January 1900, Harlan County, Kentucky, USA, d. 3 January 1988, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Hopkins, who grew up in the Renfro Valley, is remembered as an old-time singer and guitarist, but he originally…
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b. 26 January 1900, Harlan County, Kentucky, USA, d. 3 January 1988, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Hopkins, who grew up in the Renfro Valley, is remembered as an old-time singer and guitarist, but he originally learned banjo from blind Kentucky player Dick Burnett (of Burnett And Rutherford). He saw army service during World War I and on his discharge, he spent 10 years working on medicine shows that saw him tour all over the USA, frequently playing Hawaiian music. In 1930, he moved to WLS Chicago, where he became a prominent member of the Cumberland Ridge Runners. He also worked with Bradley Kincaid and Karl And Harty and established himself as a regular on the National Barn Dance. Although he was more interested in working on the radio than in records, he did record for Broadway and ARC, and in March 1941, he cut six sides for Decca Records, including ‘My Little Georgia Rose’ and ‘Wreck Of The Old Thirty-One’. He also made around 200 radio transcriptions for the MM Cole Company. He basically retired from performing in the 50s and became well known as a teacher of the banjo and appeared only occasionally up until his death in 1988.