Charles Frohman

b. 17 June 1860, Sandusky, Ohio, USA, d. 7 May 1915, Atlantic Ocean. Intent on a life in the theatre, Frohman took many menial backstage jobs as he learned his trade. He was still only in his mid-twenties…
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Artist Biography

b. 17 June 1860, Sandusky, Ohio, USA, d. 7 May 1915, Atlantic Ocean. Intent on a life in the theatre, Frohman took many menial backstage jobs as he learned his trade. He was still only in his mid-twenties when he staged his first production and was soon chalking up successes, among them being the New York premiere of Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest (1895). Throughout the last decade of the old century and the first of the new, Frohman was responsible for bringing to the stage many musical comedies. These he produced in the USA and in the UK, sometimes taking Broadway shows to London’s West End, sometimes reversing this traffic. Among Frohman’s productions in these years were The Shop Girl (1894), J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan (1899, New York/1901, London), Madame Sherry (1903, London), A Waltz Dream (1908), The Dollar Princess, The Arcadians (both 1909), The Sunshine Girl and The Girl From Utah (both 1913). Included in the latter was Jerome Kern’s timeless standard, ‘They Didn’t Believe Me’. In 1915 Frohman was aboard the S.S. Lusitania when the ship was torpedoed off the coast of Ireland. Reputedly, before the ship went down, he quoted a line from Peter Pan : ‘To die would be an awfully big adventure.’