Brian Golbey

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British fiddle player Brian Golbey was the son of a Sussex cowman and grew up listening to early American country music. By the time he was 11, Golbey knew how to play both the harmonica and the old-fashioned…
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British fiddle player Brian Golbey was the son of a Sussex cowman and grew up listening to early American country music. By the time he was 11, Golbey knew how to play both the harmonica and the old-fashioned melodeon, the instrument his father played. He received his first guitar, a rarity in 1950s Britain, and also learned to play the fiddle. Young Golbey made his professional debut in 1953 playing at local celebrations for the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. After time spent in the military, he joined the folk movement of the '60s and made his professional debut in 1966 at local folk clubs. The following year Golbey and banjo player Pete Stanley teamed up to tour and appear on radio and television. During this time, Golbey and his friend Jim Marshall started the very first country music club in Great Britain. In 1970, Golbey split with Stanley to pursue a solo career in British country music. He made his recording debut in the spring and the following year came to the U.S. After he met Ernest Tubb, the Texas Troubadour invited him to appear on Midnight Jamboree, which led to performances on WWVA's Wheeling Jamboree and the Renfro Valley Barn Dance.

Upon his return to Britain, Golbey formed a trio with Patsy Montana and Mac Wiseman, touring with the band until 1975, when he and pal Allan Taylor founded the folk group Cajun Moon. They made one well-received album and then broke up in 1976. In 1977, he and Stanley reunited and toured Europe until the mid-'80s, when they both decided to slow down. Since then, they have limited appearances to the occasional festival or club engagement. In 1993, Golbey received the BCMA Committee Award for his service to British country music.