Hungarian pianist Annie Fischer made her debut at the age of 10 and studied with Ernst von Dohnányi at the Franz Liszt Academy of Music. Her performance of the Liszt Sonata in B minor won Fischer first prize at the 1933 Liszt International Piano Competition, but her concert career was barely underway when war broke out; Fischer fled to Sweden. Afterwards Fischer returned to Hungary, and although she made her New York debut in 1961, she was only seldom seen in the United States and based her career in continental Europe. In her native Hungary, Fischer was particularly well vaulted and was awarded the Kossuth Prize three times. Mozart and Beethoven were Fischer's bread and butter composers, but she also excelled in later Romantic repertoire and in a few modern works, most notably the Piano Concerto No. 3 of Béla Bartók. Although ...
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