Amadeo Baldovino

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Amadeo Baldovino was born to a music-loving family that was part of the Italian colony in Alexandria. Among that population was a fine teacher for starting cellists, Francesco Serato, who imparted to…
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Amadeo Baldovino was born to a music-loving family that was part of the Italian colony in Alexandria. Among that population was a fine teacher for starting cellists, Francesco Serato, who imparted to his pupils an excellent bowing technique and quick, accurate fingering.

The family moved to Bologna, Italy, where Amadeo studied with Camillo Oblach at the G.B. Martini School of Music. He started appearing in public at the age of ten years and became a popular player in and around Bologna. He graduated from the Martini School at the age of 14. While still a teenager, he played with such major orchestras as the Amsterdam Concertgebouw, the Czech Philharmonic, and the Berlin Philharmonic.

At the age of 20, Baldovino decided to put his concert career on hold while he worked on two areas where he thought he was ill-prepared: the study of musical composition and general educational studies including philosophy. He graduated in composition from the Martini school in 1940 and resumed his concert career. However, Italy was fighting in World War II and Baldovino was called to military service, again causing him to shelve his concert career. After the war finished, he had to start over again in a Europe that was only slowly recovering from the devastation of the conflict.

In 1951, an Italian violinist named Giaconda de Vito invited Baldovino to be her partner in a performance of the Brahms Double Concerto in London with the Philharmonia Orchestra, Malcolm Sargent conducting. He received splendid notices and international attention began to come his way. As his solo career took flight, he also extended his activities in chamber music. In 1957, he formed the Trio Italiano d'Archi (Italian String Trio) with violinist Franco Gulli and violist Bruno Giuranna. The ensemble became very successful. Baldovino left it in 1962 when he was invited to join the Trio di Trieste.

He has also pursued a notable teaching career as a member of the faculties of the Perugia and Rome Conservatories and the Accademia di Santa Cecilia in Rome, and is in demand as a master class teacher throughout Italy. He plays three lovely cellos, a Tononi, a Postiglione, and the 1711 "Mara" Stradivarius, which was nearly lost in a ferryboat accident in the Rio de la Plata between Montevideo and Buenos Aires. He is known for a rich, full tone and solid intonation. He advises students to join chamber music ensembles and to keep such groups together despite initial arguments and the pressure to make quick economic returns in other kinds of music-making.