Olivia

The Lost Lolli

  • AllMusic Rating
    9
  • User Ratings (0)
  • Your Rating

AllMusic Review by

The Lost Lolli is not a real album, but a compilation based on four EPs recorded in 2003, when one audacious young ex-pop star tried to single-handedly change the J-rock industry. There are two new cuts on the LP, "Alone in Our Castle" and "Fake Flowers," and they seem intended to summarize what kind of music Olivia was playing at the time, and how good she was at it. "Alone in Our Castle" is a somber and haunting track that channels Björk with less grandeur, but also less kitsch and with the same low-profile tension, and "Fake Flowers" is the dark and simple industrial rock assault performed with surgical precision. The EPs had enough of both heavy and quiet material, but The Lost Lolli is dominated by songs of the former kind, from "Blind Unicorn" to "Sea Me." These tracks are rooted in music of Marilyn Manson, Rammstein, and Deftones, having the same beefy guitars over fast rhythm patterns, but the girl's take on it is good enough to almost wish those bands were comprised of ladies (who also wouldn't try to imitate men as Kittie do). The Lost Lolli is moody, and can be venomous and pissed (the punky "Devil's in me"), but it's never tormented or angsty: instead, Olivia infuses the alt metal with a good dose of romanticism that gives the songs a new, more humane dimension without making them poppy or ostentatious (think Evanescence). Some of the tracks are still underscored by sinister synths, and there are a few slower numbers that explore the dark, or, rather, hypnotic side of the album ("Celestial Delinquent," "Denial") as well, but those tracks and the powerfests are equally convincing. That has a lot to do with Olivia's singing, which is some of the best in the business, hands down, not just because of the strength of her vocal chords, but also because of her natural, flowing way of singing (as well as shouting, crooning, and what-have-you) and the sheer honesty of delivery. The Lost Lolli may have charted like a stone (it peaked at number 111), but it's a hidden gem of Japanese rock and even of alternative music in general.

Track Listing

Title/Composer Performer Time
1
5:18
2
3:01
3
4:02
4
3:44
5
3:43
6
5:11
7
3:16
8
3:50
9
4:15
10
4:00
11
5:40
12
3:53
13
4:49
blue highlight denotes track pick