Doris Day

Tea for Two/Lullaby of Broadway

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Doris Day's ascension to stardom in 1948 was a bonanza for both Warner Bros. Pictures, where she had a film contract, and Columbia Records, where she had a record contract. Warner didn't have its own record company in those days (that came along in 1957), so there were no soundtrack albums from Day's movie musicals. But Columbia learned it could succeed with a reasonable facsimile when it had Day and Harry James record an album of songs from Young Man With a Horn and saw the LP soar to number one in 1950. A series of similar projects quickly followed. Tea for Two was a loose adaptation of the Broadway musical No, No, Nanette, while Lullaby of Broadway was an original script packed with old songs to which Warner owned copyright. Day made separate recordings of the material for Columbia, and they were issued as eight-song, 10" LPs; Collectables combines them here onto one CD that still runs only 45 minutes. The song scores were miscellaneous collections of standards to begin with, and Day wasn't even very strict about adhering to them with Columbia. Rodgers & Hart's "Here in My Arms" and the Paul James/Kay Swift song "Fine and Dandy" were not in the films at all, and some songs from the films were not re-recorded here. So, this album is basically a set of Day performances of old show tunes, accompanied either by an orchestra or by a small group (the Page Cavanaugh Trio or the Buddy Cole Quartet), with Gene Nelson (who appeared in both films) turning up occasionally during the first half, often as a tap dancer. Day is as winning interpreting Gershwin or Porter as she is breathing life into the newly written mediocrity "I Love the Way You Say Goodnight," making this a strong early collection.

Track Listing

Sample Title/Composer Performer Time
1 2:26
2 3:07
3 2:50
4 2:41
5 2:33
6 3:22
7 2:28
8 3:14
9 2:29
10 2:49
11 2:55
12 2:49
13 2:19
14 2:54
15 3:03
16 3:14
blue highlight denotes track pick